PA Parent and Family Alliance

is a state-wide program of the

Allegheny Family Network

 

We are grateful for the financial support from SAMHSA, OMHSAS, and the PA Care Partnership

contact@pafamilyalliance.org

425 N Craig St. Suite 500

Pittsburgh, PA 15213 

Tel: 412-438-6129   

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You're invited to join PA Care Partnership's Community of Practice

Updated: Jan 23

A community of practice is simply a group of people who agree to meet regularly and work together to improve practice.

We invite you to join us in our community of practice. Are you a:

· Youth or young adult,

· Family member,

· System partner,

· Community leader, or a

· Cultural leader?

Let your voice be heard, join our community of practice! **Be sure to tell them you hear about their opening from PA Parent Alliance.**

Contact Kelsey Leonard leonardkt@upmc.edu


What is a Community of Practice?

In Pennsylvania, the community of practice has several parts:

First, OMHSAS and the directors of SAMHSA funded projects join together in a community to connect around issues, learn what each has to share and act together to influence practice.

This community has reach and influence, but they alone cannot make meaningful sustainable practice change. They need individuals in many places and in many roles to help them identify and address barriers to effective practice. Likewise, when a promising practice change is identified, they need a network of individuals who will help support practice change in the field.

The PA Care Partnership Cultural and Linguistic Competence Community of Practice (CLC CoP) encourages decision makers, practitioners, families and youth to work together to make a difference. The CLC CoP will meet regularly as agreed upon by practice group members.


Learn more about the PA Care Partnership


The CLC CoP goals will be collaboratively determined by members but may include to:

· Assess and improve upon cultural appropriateness of services for children, youth, family and community-driven practices

· Continuously gain an improved understanding of cultural issues and social justice

· Involve youth, family, and community partners in decision-making

· Identify training opportunities related to cultural competency

· Commitment to CLC assessments and data driven decision-making

· Encourage local commitments to support cultural competency

· Assess service needs of cultural groups and make recommendations to adjust services to meet needs

· And more . . .


Questions?

Contact Kelsey Leonard leonardkt@upmc.edu